I was going through the comments – I don’t know whether you’re still in need of money – but when I was in need of money I had joined awign for an internship as well as I also started playing on fantasy sports too – and I could easily cash out money to my paytm wallet, since you don’t have bank as you can join playerzpot – there you can easily cash out money to paytm wallet..but if you have bank ac and pan card then do play on dream11, starpick or halaplay. If you really in need of money try working as an intern it’s really helpful.
Living in India one finds earning money difficult, the reason being there’s a critical pressure of career and curriculum as well. My own personal experience holds a similar story of a hectic schedule whilst carving my way to earn my pocket money and managing graduation studies. It all depends on one’s priorities and the kind of work he/she is capable of doing, whether the choices have the positive effect on his/her living or not. I have dealt with numerous questions from youngsters regarding how to earn money in college life and have written a write up regarding the same previously yet, the same doesn’t fit in with the Indian students. So here are 9 best and proven ways for an Indian student to earn money in college life:
Instead of just taking them to the thrift shop and receiving peanuts, try using BooksCounter app. Scan the book barcode, upload it to the app’s system and see which of 20+ different buyback companies offers the highest payout. Once you found the right company, all you have to do is fill in some basic information of how you’d like to get paid, download a free shipping label and pack up all the books to dispatch.
If you don’t want to start your blog, you can write for other websites. If you are good at writing, have a knack in a particular topic, not just technology, you have websites which can hire you, and pay you handsomely.  You can write for corporate websites, write paid product reviews, work for online magazines, publish your eBooks, fill online surveys, get paid to write comments, post at forums and more. However do remember, you will need to keep improving your skills, get good at writing, and research well to stay in the job.
You can even offer to sing a happy birthday song, create funny videos of yourself, and do more off-the-wall tasks. Marketing your skills is critical to reach out to your potential clients. Landing the first job is important as one job will lead to another sooner or later. If a client likes your work leave good feedback on your work, you can attract more clients. You can get more orders from existing clients if they were happy with your previous work. Popular microgig sites include:

Freelancing is the next best thing to being paid more for your full-time work, because professional work always pays more than unskilled. To find opportunities, let former colleagues or other personal connections that you’re available for freelance gigs. (Here are some ideas on how LinkedIn could be useful for that.) Or, post on marketplaces particular to your field. For instance, Mediabistro, a journalism site, allows freelancers to post profiles of their experience and services. Though these are more up to chance, designers can bid on jobs at 99Designs.com or submit a design at Threadless, to see if it will be crowdfunded. Elance-Odesk also lists many freelance opportunities, and you can also post your own services on Fiverr, although some freelancers say these services create a race to the bottom on fees and so are not very lucrative. If you're new to freelancing, here's how to set your rates, and here's how to negotiate raises with clients.
Apply for new scholarships and grants. A lot of students think that they are only eligible for funding when they initially apply for admission. This is a mistake! There are often new scholarship opportunities for upperclassmen, though they aren't always widely advertised. You may also be able to apply for external scholarships or grants, which are offered from groups outside of your school.
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